“Skiere Snoet” makes free 3D-printed splash masks for healthcare

Skiere Snoet from Twente wants to help healthcare personnel by providing them with free 3D-printed splash masks. The demand for this type of protective equipment is still high, and it cannot be sufficiently met due to the global need. Locally producing and 3D-printing these masks helps to provide people with crucial protective equipment during these critical times.

Read the full article below
 
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In short

  • Dave Borghuis of 3D-printing service TwenSpace wanted to contribute during the corona crisis and founded “Skiere Snoet”
  • There is a continuing shortage of protective equipment for medical personnel
  • “Skiere Snoet” 3D-prints splash masks for healthcare for free
TwenSpace

3D-printing service TwenSpace’s initiator, Dave Borghuis, saw that many makers worldwide started working on designing and 3D-printing essential parts that cannot be delivered now. Many volunteer initiatives were started in the Netherlands, such as Schone Bakkes from The Hague and Makers4all.eu. Many local makers and institutions have a 3D printer at home and can easily download and print a 3D model. 

Production

While 3D-printing a mask takes around one hour or more, it is still possible to create significant quantities with many 3D printers. In Twente, the makers have organised themselves within “Skiere Snoet” and would like to help in this crisis. Institutions such as Tetem, the University of Twente and Stichting ASSortiMENS have joined forces with local makers such as Vincent Groenhuis, Wout Zweers and Thomas de Groot, to offer care professionals a helping hand. 

International

Skiere Snoet is internationally active, too. In collaboration with the University of Twente, adapters for Decathlon diving masks are 3D printed and sent to France. Read more about the diving masks that researchers at the UT adapted for the ventilation of corona patients in this article. Some of these 3D-printed parts also go to Rwanda.

Want to help?

Skiere Snoet offers their masks and other 3D-printed tools for free at (care)institutions. Do you have a 3D-printer at home, and do you want to help? Skiere Snoet says they can use any help, and that you are most welcome. Do you not have a 3D-printer, but do you still want to help? It is also possible to make a small donation so that the material costs can be reimbursed for printing the masks. You can order masks or register to help via this site

Date: 20 April 2020
Source of tekst: Twente.com
Author: Twente.com